Nhsc-v1-319

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nhsc-v1-319

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Vol. I, No. 3, Ralph S. Kuykendall, p. 42 (1926). Note: Entire Dispatch No. 122 reprinted in Hawaiian Diplomatic Correspondence.)

27/ Burns, p. 168.

28/ Bailey, p. 285.

29/ Joesting, p. 213.

30/ Damon, p. 160.

31/ Joesting, p. 214.

32/ Ibid.

33/ Mellen, p. 102.

34/ Ibid., p. 103.

35/ Bailey, p. 286.

36/ Mellen, p. 107.

37/ See comment received from Robert C. Schmitt, p. 3.

38/ Mellen, p. 115.

39/ Ibid., p. 120.

40/ Ibid., p. 121.

41/ Bailey, p. <187.

42/ Mellen, p. 122.

43/ Damon, p. 166.

44/ Mellen, p. 125.

45/ Bailey, p. 288.

46/ Mellen, p. 164.

47/ Damon, p. 175.

48/ Mellen, p. 169.

49/ Damon, p. 192.

50/ Joesting, p. 217. Congressman Daniel Akaka comments that the Draft Report on page 184, "indicates that the spark that ignited the annexationists was the signing of a bill to regulate the sale of opium and a bill to establish a lottery" (Akaka's Comments, pp. 5-6). In addition, it is asserted that these bills "...were merely used as excuses by the annexationists to bring down the Monarchy" (Akaka's Comments, p.6). Other commenters raised a similar point.

The draft report does not refer to the lottery bill until page 190, in the section on Liliuokalani’s reign. Moreover, the comments do not accurately reflect the chronology of events. The lottery bill was enacted in 1893—not in 1886-1887 which is the period discussed at pages 184-185 of the draft report. More importantly, the statement cited in support of these comments is a December 20, 1893 statement made with respect to conditions in 1893 and not events in 1886-1887. Finally, pages 184-185 of the draft report refer to the "reformers"—not "annexationists."

51/ Damon, p. 192.

52/ Joesting, p. 217.

53/ Bailey, p. 21.

54/ Ibid., p. 291.

55/ Joesting, p. 218.

56/ Bailey, p. 295.

57/ Senator Daniel Inouye and others commented that the Draft Report fails to inquire into the possible role of the United States Government in the adoption of the 1887 Constitution; i.e., the extent to

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